A great mediator can help the parties navigate a complex track to resolution or confirm their decision to take the case to trial – each of which could be the right answer for their client.  An unprepared, uneducated, and uninvested mediator often can do neither. 

Don’t choose a person to help you negotiate the track to resolution who isn’t as capable as you are.  With more than 20 years’ experience with employment litigation and complex commercial cases, Michael Kelsheimer is passionate about racing and passionate about his role in support of your litigation objectives:

Preparation

It’s more than just reading submitted materials, though that alone seems too much for some mediators.  It’s understanding the law.  It’s knowing the tendencies of the judge and the lawyers on the case.  And, it’s doing everything possible in advance to help the parties get off the line as quickly as possible once mediation starts. 


Teamwork

Mediators are neutral to the dispute, but that doesn’t mean they are not your teammate. Michael believes that understanding the lawyer’s needs and their client’s goals goes a long way to facilitating a solution to their case. Toward that end, Michael makes a point to meet with counsel before each mediation to understand the complexities and unique bumps in their case.


Understanding

Litigants are complex – whether individual or entity. Listening, really listening, and asking great questions facilitates the trust necessary to really work with a mediator as a teammate to determine whether resolution or trial is the best path leading out of mediation. Asking penetrating questions and truly listening are rare skills Michael hones day in and out to help litigants be heard, which often opens the door to a discussion about resolution.


Follow Through

For any of a million reasons, the best path forward sometimes doesn’t reveal itself in a single mediation session. Many mediators take that as a license to move on. Michael doesn’t see it that way and will work the problem until the right path forward is clear even if it happens once the session is over.